Category Archives: Marketing Yourself

Who would start a gallery with the economy the way it is?

It’s a good question – who would start a gallery with the economy the way it is?

I intended to write this a year ago, when our gallery-workshop was just a few months old.
Back then we felt full of optimism but still heard nagging inner voices telling us we were a bit daft for even thinking of setting up what was effectively a shop, just when so many others were going to the wall.

On top of that, it was necessary for Jenny to leave the stability (and predictable income!) of a regular job. What were we thinking?

One year on from that part-written blog post and nearly a year and a half since we got our slightly sweaty hands on the keys to unit 4 Wakefield Country Courtyard the optimism is still there, the inner voices have been quelled and our early marketing efforts have paid off.VitreusArt-gallery-studio-Wakefield-Country-Courtyard

We’re delighted to have regular customers who seem to come in just after we’ve put new stock on display.
Our classes are steadily drawing new would-be and established artists and crafters keen to develop their skills or gain new ones.
Our studio is being used to create interesting (sometimes amazing) projects by students.
And we’re finding that folks who used to visit the Courtyard have started returning, having discovered that there’s more to see, do, eat and drink than there used to be.

So of course we’re optimistic – we’re working hard to make our business a success and seeing that pay off.

Some of the things that have really worked for us include:

Having a mix of income – we sell our own stained and fused glass, we sell other artists’ work for a commission, we run a host of our own classes in fusing, stained glass, glass appliqué and more.

We also have a talented band of artists who teach their own art forms to students for us, and we make our space and facilities available for a small fee to those who want to create but lack the tools or a suitable place to work at home.

We’ve built up a really good mailing list over the years. Our regular emails get open rates and click-through rates (which is actually much more important than opens) that are significantly higher than is common in our line of business.

A testament to this is that we’ve just taught a couple of ladies who joined our mailing list after attending our third ever class about 10 years ago; they’ve been receiving our monthly emails ever since and got in touch to ask for a private class at our studio this year.

We keep up our advertising in local magazines. When we get visitors telling us they saw us in a local magazine we know our adverts are being seen. Of course this doesn’t translate in to ROI, but we’re still ‘young’ and working to build our footfall.

We’ve also taken a leading role in encouraging our neighbouring businesses to join us in co-op advertising and that’s making a noticeable difference to the footfall across the site. It’s tempting to ease off on the advertising now we’re in our second year –it costs money after all – but we plan to keep the momentum up.

Running demo days and taster days to show visitors what we’ve got going on. These have been a huge success for us, and are a blast to run too. We invite our artists to join us for our demo days, and show off their skills.
Visitors get to see artists in action and are often inspired to join a class and have a go themselves.

The outcomes of our taster days are similar – we give customers the chance to try one of our glass crafts in a short session for just a fiver. Many then book a place on a full class knowing that they’ll enjoy it, thus reducing the risk!

Listening to customers and hunting out work we think they will like. We’ve tried hard to find work that synchronises with what our customers tell us they like, or actively looking for. We’ve also had to learn that what we like may not appeal to our customers. We remind ourselves every now and again that we are not our own customers!

Of course there’s a lot more we do that’s helping bring in customers – giving talks at WIs for example.
It’s all part of doing what we can to build our gallery, grow our reputation and help our lovely customers own or give art as a present, or even make their own art.

We’d love to hear from you if you’ve seen art you like, have tried a class and enjoyed it, or if you’re an artist yourself.

If you’d like to visit and find out about art and craft classes or check out the art we’ve got on display you’ll find us here:

Vitreus Art, Unit 4 Wakefield Country Courtyard,
Off the A5, near Potterspury, Northants NN12 7QX
Tel 01327 810320

Join our email newsletter group here…

VitreusArt-mapWakefield-Country-Courtyard

 

Small retailers – it’s time to smile!

Yes, a lot of retailers are finding it tough out there.VitreusArtGallery

Despite recent reports that new car registrations are higher than ever suggesting that the UK economy is booming, the underlying story is that cheap finance is driving much of consumer behaviour, but that’s only benefitting sales of high-value goods – like cars and kitchens, and white goods and massive TVs too big for most UK living rooms!

Down at the lower-cost end of the scale, shoppers are being careful what they spend their disposable income on and that’s affecting many smaller shops.

Today we learn that M&S has had a woeful set of Christmas results; even my beloved Waitrose didn’t have such a brilliant Christmas, which was a surprise to me.

Doubtless there are lots of reasons for the prevailing sense of doom among many retailers but not being qualified in economics, I’m going to refrain from speculating. What I do know is – there’s a lot we can all do to help ourselves.

Part of this is marketing – I’ll come back to that.

Most immediately for me, having experienced extremely lack-lustre service in more than one smaller shop lately, and with Jenny prodding me to write about some of her experiences too, I’m going to ask you some questions…

  • Do you greet a visitor to your shop (or your stand at a craft fair?!) when they first step inside?
  • Do you offer to help, or ask a friendly question a minute or two after?
  • Do you manage to smile when on duty, and especially when customers are present?
  • When you see a potential customer is in need of help, do you get up off your chair and talk to them?

I hope so, but on the example of shops I and Jenny have visited recently not all independent shopkeepers do…

A key part of the appeal small, independent shops have for customers weary of high-street homogeneity is friendly service from people who are willing to help.
Product knowledge, genuinely helpful service and a cheery welcome are key differentiators – essential when we small retailers really need to stand out!

In our case, as a working studio-gallery with our own and other artists’ work on sale, going the extra mile to help a customer choose, or transport a piece of art, finding out if the artist has ‘something similar in different colours’  or getting something broken fixed efficiently, these are all aspects of service we consider to be the minimum necessary – not extras.

Given a chance, most consumers will moan and complain about the service they receive in our chain stores; I hear that and think – then come to our little shop and be treated like a human!

And that brings us to marketing. We need to get that point about treating customers as humans across to our future customers, and gently remind our current customers about it too.

So many small retailers are hoping that customers will find them, and then spend money in their shops. For me, hoping is not a strategy.

I do detect an element of ‘I have a shop – people will come in and buy things’ without the ‘I need to make sure people know about my shop’ among some of the small retailers I know.

Again, in our case, we advertise locally, we use national and local ‘what’s on’ websites and Facebook pages, we continually develop our email subscription and regularly (about every two weeks) email our list with news, questions, updates on our art courses and much more.

We speak at WI and U3A events about our craft, we take part in craft shows and cultural do’s.

We host events where visitors can see art being created and even have a go themselves, we get together with our neighbouring retailers to put on open days and outdoor events, we use our own social media pages too of course, but we don’t rely on them, and we do everything we can to encourage word-of-mouth promotion.

This is especially important – although we’ve only been in our gallery for a year, we’re increasingly getting visitors who tell us their friend (or relative, partner, neighbour) recommended us. Lovely!

But this only happens if we give good service and make our gallery a fun and interesting place to browse. And on top of this, we make sure we always have some work in progress on the bench. We’re a working studio-gallery and it’s proving to be a real winner for us – seeing work being made is a great conversation starter, it allows us to demonstrate our competence.

And another blessing – when we’re running classes at our studio visitors see what we’re doing and some of them want to get involved; we almost always take booking for classes when we’re running a class that day!

So the take-away from this last point is – activity. What can you do in your own shop to get activity going, get interest going, get customers asking you for more?

Demos? Have-a-go sessions? Events and talks, taster days?
Special products that the chains don’t or won’t stock?
Offering true expertise in your field that the staff in the chains just can’t provide?

An interesting, fun, quirky environment far removed from the corporate boxes on retail parks?  Yes, that all might sound like a lot of work, perhaps?

Maybe a better way of thinking about this is – marketing is a fundamental component of every business; just having a shop and putting things in it isn’t going to cut it any more (if it ever did).

It’s tough out there so get on with the marketing, make your offer really distinctive and fun, and remember to smile!

I don’t need a website, I’m an artist…

I’m still rather surprised that many artists don’t yet have their own websites. This comes up in conversation quite often in our gallery, especially when an artist is presenting their work to us. Often the work is great, but the artist isn’t aware of why they need to promote themselves online.

Others have a website but it’s out of date, or a lash-up, or it just looks out of step with the standards of presentation expected these days. Sorry if that sounds harsh, or dismissive, but let’s be completely frank for the avoidance of doubt!

The ‘explanation’ tends to be one of these:

  • ‘A friend built my website but he never has time to update it and I don’t like to hassle him.’
  • ‘I did it myself but it took me a long time and I’m not very happy with it.’
  • ‘I have a gallery page on an art site but I don’t know if it’s really working and I can’t really update it very easily.’
  • I use Facebook / Instagram / Flikr / social media platform du-jour
  • ‘I had a site built for me but updates are expensive so I don’t really use it.’
  • I sell on Artfinder so why do I need a website?
  • Or – quite often – ‘I haven’t got a website’.

So let’s consider some of the reasons why it’s essential for people like us to have our own websites. And to keep them fresh and up to date!

Make it easy for your customers to find you and your work

Your future customers are searching for information about art. Some of them are looking for work that’s like yours. Some of them may even be Googling for you, your work, and for ways to buy from you. Let’s make that as simple and rewarding as possible. Whether they already know about you or not, your objective is to make it possible for them to find you!

The cost of having a basic website is probably about the same as doing 1 or 2 shows or craft fairs. And your website is open for business 24 hours a day, 365 days a year…
Even plumbers have websites these days; you’re a creative visual person – what you do needs to be seen much more than a plumber’s work!

Reach your customers yourself

When you have a website you’re proud of, you can use it as the reference point for your newsletters, update emails, social media activity….and so on. Emails and social media posts can link back to pages, or specific pieces on your site, or to your ‘events’ page instead of going nowhere.
This is far preferable to sending word docs, PDFs or images as attachments to your database. Nowadays attachments are highly likely to get trapped in your recipients’ spam filters. You can easily produce visually rich emails that do justice to your reputation as a creative person!
Services like Mailchimp (which we use for Vitreus Art’s newsletters and I use for newsletters for clients) make managing your circulation list and creating and sending your emails very easy and professional-looking.

In our world, once someone has bought from you, they’ll probably buy again.
Provided they can find you, and you continue to nurture the relationship!

Build your reputation – aka your artist brand

Your website is a great place for showing off your design skills and your artistic ability. It’s where you get to show how your work is the result of years of experience and dedication; you can sell the unique aspects of your work; you can emphasise the hand-made nature of what you do. Use your site to ‘sell’ the value and uniqueness of what you do, helping to distinguish you from the far-off factories that churn out cheap alternatives and the charlatans who cut corners!

We know plenty of gallery owners who won’t consider artists and craftspeople who don’t have a website. It’s an indication of the seriousness with which you take your work.

Sell your art online directly

It’s a long time since ecommerce was the preserve of established businesses, who paid web developers to have their own bespoke ‘e-commerce engine’. With the advent of PayPal, and simple ‘self administer’ shopping carts, you can have a highly-secure website shopping and payments facility at little cost and minimal hassle. If you elect to use PayPal no special technical know-how is required – just your time and a bit of organisation.

Showcase your work at a distance

Unless you have the time to attend shows or seek trade buyers & galleries further afield, it’s very difficult to achieve recognition and gain sales overseas or even in your own country. There’s a whole world of art buyers and potential artistic partners out there and a decent website brings them all closer to you! And with inexpensive courier services(be careful which ones you choose though – cheapest is usually worst!), and simple e-commerce systems available, selling to overseas customers is hardly any more difficult than selling to someone in your own town.

Make your shows, exhibitions and press releases more successful

Perhaps you send out invites to your shows or private views? Being able to highlight these online is the first step. You can then get yourself listed on the many ‘what’s on’ sites, local arts and tourist info sites, and on all sorts of other listings websites, with links back to your site. Experience shows that the people who use these sites often do follow the links to further info – to get times, dates, venue details, maps and an idea of what’s on offer.

If you send out press releases, being able to point editors and journalists towards more information increases the chance your release will get used.

A further thought – if you publicise your shows (of course you do!) – people who can’t attend but want to know more can see some of what they’ve missed on your site. It’s like having a permanent exhibition, open to all!

Own your art ‘brand’ and control your presence

As an artist selling your work (and yourself) online do you have a cyber-home, or are you in the equivalent of a squat in a friend’s house?

After you spend (probably) too much time ‘interacting’ with people you don’t really know on Twitter and Facebook do you have a home for your work to direct people to visit? Where they can see a good selection of your best work? Where they can judge your skills and get a feel for you as an artist?

It seems that you can’t go anywhere on the internet without bumping in to a gallery website or craft sales site promising to sell your work. There must be tens of thousands of these sites now, with more being created every day. All make essentially the same promise – to sell your work in return for a commission and a little of your time to upload your images.

You wouldn’t only exhibit at one physical gallery or sell at just one craft show. It’s effectively outsourcing the selling aspect of your job, right?

It’s also abdicating control of your online presence – your artist’s brand. When you upload art to a gallery site, you upload your control too. You need your own online space with your name on it!

This is a fundamental point – if your work is only seen on other people’s sites, they have the control over what you can show and how you sell it.

This isn’t just vanity – it’s about retaining control over your brand, determining the presentation of your work, and getting your own message out about why you do what you do. This is your virtual identity and that’s too valuable to just hand over to a website owner or social media site.

The naked truth is – when you put your work on other people’s sites, it becomes their work. They’ll sell it for you (according to their terms). They may show it, they may reject it. They may show it alongside work from other artists, and ultimately you’re one of many other artists on the same site – all jostling for attention.

This is why it’s important that artists have their own online presence that they have control over.

This is not to say you shouldn’t use other art sales sites, but you definitely should have your own site – and use it to promote your own work and your own artistic practice.

And another important point – make sure you own your domain (like www.vitreus-art.co.uk) and arrange for your website to be hosted on that domain. Again, it’s about control. If you opt for a ‘free’ or low-cost package that gives you a domain like www.mikesart.greathosting.net that domain actually ‘belongs’ to someone else. They get the benefit of the search engine traffic, while you get to look unprofessional and lose control over what happens with that domain.

Happily, when you have your own online space, you’ll have the ability to develop it as you develop as an artist.  You’ll have to pay upfront to purchase your domain and find a decent hosting company, but the long-term benefits for your artistic brand will hugely outweigh the cost.

Use all the outlets you can – always be selling!

At the risk of seeming contradictory, the argument for having your own website is not undermined by the availability of other selling sites. Use those other sites, enjoy, choose wisely and make sure you manage what’s on sale where, and for how much. But don’t let any success you enjoy on those sites be an excuse for not having your own home on the internet. It’s not an either-or!

So there you have it – take control of how you’re found, presented and sold on the internet by managing your own website. Especially if you’re serious about your art!

P.S. for a bit of fun, head over to http://www.artybollocks.com/ to create your own highly pretentious and totally made-up artist’s statement. It’s a bit naughty and somewhat irreverent!

So you want to get your art in to a gallery?

So you want to sell your work in a gallery?

As Jenny and I approach our anniversary of running a gallery, and having been submitting and selling work through galleries for more than 10 years we have some experience of both angles.

Just how does an artist get their work shown in a gallery, and what can an artist do to help promote their work?

 Are you ready to sell through galleries?

Before even thinking about which galleries to approach, it’s time to think about what stage of your artistic career you’ve reached. Do you have an identity as an artist, does your work have a style of its own? Do you have a body of work that the potential buyer would recognise as the work of one artist?

It seems harsh to say this but…. if your work looks like a random collection in different styles and media when shown on the same wall, then perhaps it’s not ready to be sent to a gallery.

Do you have a website (with a proper domain, not www.angelcakes21.wix.com), up to date with your latest work and great photos? Proper business cards?!

Next – do your research. Find galleries that have work at a similar price point or feel or subject as yours – don’t expect a fine art gallery to take watercolours of local scenes, or prints. And high-end work isn’t likely to be suitable for a gallery that majors on affordable art.  Visit galleries, figure out which look to be a good match, and pay attention to their stock and artist selection.

 Presenting your work

We see this as two related but different subjects – getting your work ready to be shown (and sold) and getting your work in to a gallery.

Firstly – it’s an old cliché but it’s true – the frame (at least partly) sells your work; a good frame, sympathetic to the art, well made and stylish, will significantly enhance the saleability of your work.

The converse – a frame that doesn’t fit the shape, size and colour of the work, or one that is cheaply or poorly made – cheapens the work, and reduces its wall appeal.

We often see work shown to us in a varying range of frame styles.To the gallery owner this says – doesn’t care about the work sufficiently, doesn’t imagine it being bought and hung in a customer’s home, isn’t serious about selling their work.
I’m sure that’s not you, is it?

Take a look at art by known artists in local galleries. Now compare the standard of framing with yours. Be honest with yourself!

And where you’re offering mounted work without frames – how is the quality of the mount? And does the cellophane wrapper look neat? Have you included a card or some info about you in the wrapper?
Un-framed or un-mounted prints are meant to be lower in price than originals, but not cheap-looking!

And what about photos? Great photos really help sell art – on your website, on artfinder, when pitching to galleries or submitting work to exhibitions. A photo of a framed and glazed piece with poor lighting, reflections, keystone distortion or a distracting background will do the opposite!

Even established artists sometimes forget to take photos before they send off their work to be framed but new artists can’t afford to make this mistake.

In our gallery we rarely accept work from artists who can’t supply good photos. Once a piece has been framed it’s very hard to get a decent pic to use on websites, social media and promotions.

And as for getting your work considered by a gallery….

Most days in our gallery an artist will call in with work they want to show us. And almost every time, we’re busy with customers, or working on a piece of our own on the workbench, or up a ladder, re-hanging….

The chances are, if you call at a gallery without an appointment the gallery owner won’t be able to take the time to talk to you and look at your work.

A much better approach is to call or email and ask how the gallery likes to be approached. At least you then know how best to get an audience! Most galleries will ask you to send a few photos and a link to your website.

The photos you send may well be the determining factor so we suggest do as you’re asked, and send good piccys!

If the gallery owner likes what you send you’ll hear from them – galleries are often looking for new work of sellable quality so make sure your photos do justice to your work.

Remember – the gallery only makes money on art that appeals to customers enough to get them to part with money; work that is unlikely to sell isn’t going to be accepted!

A response that is guaranteed to fail is – ‘my work can’t be photographed / has to be seen in person / I’m worried my images will be copied’. Really?

If you’re invited to call in with examples, make sure your work is ready to sell – framed, mounted, wrapped, clean, un-marked and your best current work. Work that is old, marked, damaged or just lack-lustre may well shut that opportunity down before you’ve got started.
And be prepared – artist statement, expected wall prices, stock list, info and photos the gallery can use to promote your work…

 Pricing and commissions

Here’s a thorny one a lot of artists get wrong – offering the same work for sale in a gallery and on their website at different prices. Don’t do this please! Decide on a price that leaves room for the commission the gallery charges, and make sure that price is THE price – wherever else that piece is pictured.

And if someone contacts you and asks if you can offer a reduction by trading directly, we suggest you politely decline and direct the customer back to the gallery. You may get a sale this way, but you’ll damage the relationship you have with the gallery for the long term.

It’s important to be clear about prices – low priced work generates such a low commission any respectable gallery is likely to turn the work down – it generates too little income for the wall space occupied.

Most galleries charge 40-50% commission on sales – make sure your wall price (the price the piece will be sold at) allows enough for that commission and for you to make what your work deserves.

If the gallery puts someone in touch with you to commission a bespoke piece, paying the gallery a finders-fee will keep that relationship sweet. We don’t charge a ‘contact’ commission in these circumstances, but many galleries do.

And while we’re on the subject of commission, let’s deal with that question we’ve all heard – what does a gallery do for its 40 (or 50)%?

  • It provides a safe place for you to display your work to the public, including potential buyers
  • It covers its rent, rates, staff costs, insurance and utilities
  • It promotes both your work, and you as an artist to buyers – working to bring in new potential customers for you
  • It provides feedback – what’s being looked at, what’s not, what you could sell more of, what not to make more of
  • It often will provide advice and pointers towards enhancing your professionalism as an artist
  • It takes credit card payments and deals with the admin of sales and artist payments
  • And many more intangibles….

Professionalism

We encourage you to also consider your approach to being an artist.

Have you registered as self-employed, for example? Even if you have a ‘normal’ job being registered as self-employed means you’ll be keeping on top of taxes, expenses and your business admin.

Have you run your own shows or open studios, or done some local press work?
Is your work well-presented and ready to sell?

Do you understand your market, and work to reflect the tastes of that market?
Are you organised with stock lists and prices?

Do you turn up to appointments or exhibitions or promotional events on time and do what you can to promote yourself AND the gallery you’re working with?

Promoting your work and the galleries you work with

That last point above prompts me to delve a little more in to this subject in another post.

For now, ask yourself – am I doing a good job of promoting myself?

  • These days a personal, up-to-date business website is the minimum required.
  • An active presence on social media promoting your work and your gallery partners is expected too these days.
  • Do you email your contact list when you create new work, or get work accepted by a new gallery?
  • Do you look for ways to mention your work and the galleries where it can be seen?
  • It’s certainly not enough to get work accepted by a gallery and then forget about it.

The more you do to expand your audience, to engage with new customers and to direct art lovers to your galleries the better your sales will be, and the faster your reputation as an artist to be followed will grow!

Galleries have finite wall space – artists that actively work to boost sales will get more of that wall space, and will be invited to share in joint promotions, events, private views, and all sorts of other ways to grow sales and reputation. Don’t miss out!

I hope this is useful to you; good luck and happy selling!
Mike

It’s been a funny sort of stained glass year…

Kinetic Op/Art - a 1.2m wide stained glass commission completed in 2012

Kinetic Op/Art – a 1.2m wide stained glass commission completed in 2012

Do you remember the fab Ronnie Barker sitcom Open all Hours, with Ronnie as G-g-g-granville and David Jason as his downtrodden assistant?
Then you’ll remember how each episode would conclude with Mr Barker standing outside his shop saying ‘It’s been a funny sort of day…’

It seems a bit premature to be reviewing the year with two months to go, but I’ve had several chats with artists lately and it’s made me reflective!

I don’t know about you, but we’ve sold more large pieces this year than in most previous years. Some people have still got money to spend on art, and we seem to have come in to contact with more of them lately.

We know how we’ve met some of them – some of them saw us at craft shows where our combination of demos, work on show and cheeky chat has really worked this year.

We’ve sold more pieces in galleries this year too – big and small. It’s always hard to know how those customers find us, but we can say that when we’ve put larger, higher priced pieces in galleries they’ve sold better than the affordable pieces we used to supply. Change of policy there for 2013 – we just need to make some larger pieces now ‘cos we’ve sold all the others!

And there’s another ‘learning’ from that – we need to make more time to make pieces to sell. In 2013 we’ll pass up on the early-season shows we used to do when the weather was freezing. Instead we’ll be cosy inside making stuff!

We’ve also won more large commissions this year too. Most of these have arisen out of shows we did, in some cases more than a year ago. So we’ll be making the most of the big shows we’ll do next year – more large work, more demos, more proactivity in networking and talking to potential art buyers.

We’ve also had more traffic via our website – especially looking for class places. Pat on the back for me there as I’ve been working on the SEO on our site a lot more this year. Even Panda and Penguin didn’t dent our traffic, which leads me to conclude that people are looking for us specifically. And that seems to be because we’ve also done more demo days and Open Studios this year.

Part of that has also been because we’ve worked more closely with venue owners on promoting our classes – through events like the one Stani Gallery organised early in the year and open days at Rowans Gallery in Brackley and the Herts Craft Collective at Radlett.

We’ve also found that demand for our Cornwall 5-day stained glass workshop has been stronger even than last year.
We’ve had repeat students, new students, and future students all contacting us throughout the year wanting places on classes already full up.

I’m also happy with the email list growth we’ve achieved – more sign-ups but crucially more active sign-ups. A large list of people who never respond is no good to anyone! I set myself the task of recruiting more subscribers and efforts in SEO, making subscription more valuable and in making our newsletters more entertaining is paying off.

And we’ve just come back from this year’s Cornwall workshop. A great class, great students, lovely work with a high percentage of pieces designed by our students, which is one of our objectives with the course. Thanks to all of our students then, for working so hard!

While we think we do a good job we seek feedback wherever we can, for improvement, new ideas to try out, and for ways to give our students more inspiration and stimulus. This year’s session has given both Jenny and me some good ideas which we’ll implement next year.

We also made more work for ourselves in Cornwall in setting up and packing up. We’ve already identified ways we can improve – to keep doing the same thing without considering what other ways there might be is daft I reckon!

So overall, my conclusions are:

  • there are people buying art (and other high-value discretionary purchases) – artists just need to attract and persuade them
  • being seen in public making art and demonstrating is infinitely more compelling than just standing around scratching one’s head
  • if you’re not sure a particular marketing activity is working, it probably aint – either the data is there or it isn’t.
  • people need to see and get close to art, particularly when it’s high in value – selling one-off art from websites is getting harder but a website can do the job of creating the introduction in advance
  • invest time in making work for galleries and they’ll invest more effort in selling it
  • take care of where your new customers are coming from – use your web stats to guide your efforts
  • make sure you keep in touch with your customers and contacts – art is a personal business
  • don’t keep doing things that aren’t working!

I’d like to hear your observations about 2012, and your own personal field of the arts – what are your aspirations or expectations for 2013?
Leave a comment or get in touch!

Happy creating,
Mike

P.S. You can see more of the commissions we’ve worked on this year on our Facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Vitreus-Art/365501121283?fref=ts

You can see more about the stained glass we create here:
http://www.vitreus-art.co.uk/stained-glass-commissions.html